SP4 Donald Ward Evans, Jr.
SP4 Donald Ward Evans, Jr.
23 years old from Covina, California
Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
January 27, 1967

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Donald Ward Evans, Jr. (ASN: 56413728), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tri Tam, Republic of Vietnam, on 27 January 1967.

Specialist Fourth Class Evans left his position of relative safety with his platoon which had not yet been committed to the battle to answer the calls for medical aid from the wounded men of another platoon which was heavily engaged with the enemy force. Dashing across 100 meters of open area through a withering hail of enemy fire and exploding grenades, he administered lifesaving treatment to one individual and continued to expose himself to the deadly enemy fire as he moved to treat each of the other wounded men and to offer them encouragement.

Realizing that the wounds of one man required immediate attention, Specialist Fourth Class Evans dragged the injured soldier back across the dangerous fire-swept area, to a secure position from which he could be further evacuated. Miraculously escaping the enemy fusillade, Specialist Fourth Class Evans returned to the forward location. As he continued the treatment of the wounded, he was struck by fragments from an enemy grenade. Despite his serious and painful injury he succeeded in evacuating another wounded comrade, rejoined his platoon as it was committed to battle and was soon treating other wounded soldiers. As he evacuated another wounded man across the fire covered field, he was severely wounded. Continuing to refuse medical attention and ignoring advice to remain behind, he managed with his waning strength to move yet another wounded comrade across the dangerous open area to safety. Disregarding his painful wounds and seriously weakened from profuse bleeding, he continued his lifesaving medical aid and was killed while treating another wounded comrade.

Specialist Fourth Class Evan’s extraordinary valor, dedication and indomitable spirit saved the lives of several of his fellow soldiers, served as an inspiration to the men of his company, were instrumental in the success of their mission, and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

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1st Lt. Loren Douglas Hagen

1st Lt. Loren Douglas Hagen
25 years old from Fargo, North Dakota
U.S. Army Training Advisory Group
February 25, 1946 – August 7, 1971

U.S. Army

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Loren Douglas Hagen, United States Army (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as the team leader of a small reconnaissance team with the U.S. Army Training Advisory Group, in action against enemy aggressor forces while operating deep within enemy-held territory in the Republic of Vietnam, on 7 August 1971.

At approximately 0630 hours on the morning of 7 August 1971 the small team came under a fierce assault by a superior-sized enemy force using heavy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and rocket fire. First Lieutenant Hagen immediately began returning small-arms fire upon the attackers and successfully led this team in repelling the first enemy onslaught. He then quickly deployed his men into more strategic defense locations before the enemy struck again in an attempt to overrun and annihilate the beleaguered team’s members. First Lieutenant Hagen repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire directed at him as he constantly moved about the team’s perimeter, directing fire, rallying the members, and resupplying the team with ammunition, while courageously returning small arms and hand grenade fire in a valorous attempt to repel the advancing enemy force.

The courageous actions and expert leadership abilities of First Lieutenant Hagen were a great source of inspiration and instilled confidence in the team members. After observing an enemy rocket make a direct hit on and destroy one of the team’s bunkers, First Lieutenant Hagen moved toward the wrecked bunker in search for team members despite the fact that the enemy force now controlled the bunker area. With total disregard for his own personal safety, he crawled through the enemy fire while returning small-arms fire upon the enemy force. Undaunted by the enemy rockets and grenades impacting all around him, First Lieutenant Hagen desperately advanced upon the destroyed bunker until he was fatally wounded by enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire.

With complete disregard for his personal safety, First Lieutenant Hagen’s courageous gallantry, extraordinary heroism, and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty, at the cost of his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

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Sgt. James Hinson

Sgt. James Hinson
U.S. Marines


Sgt. James Hinson, Marine Barracks Washington motor transportation operator, prepares a dish for a homeless person during a So Others Might Eat volunteer event in northwest Washington, D.C., Oct. 20, 2011. Fifteen Barracks Marines volunteered to assist the SOME staff in feeding homeless men and women from the nation’s capitol region.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

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Lt. Richard Biedermann (Ret.)

Lt.Richard Biedermann (Ret.)
89 years old from Tulsa, Oklahoma
May 28, 1922 – October 3, 2011

U.S. Navy

When Dick Biedermann asked the organizing committee of the Oklahoma Honor Flights how much more was needed to be raised he was told $10,000. His response was “Piece of cake. I can raise that”. And in only four weeks he did just that. In fact, he raised $16,000 and in doing so was able to help send 105 of his fellow WWII veterans to D.C. to see the national WWII Memorial back in February of this year. He was scheduled to go with them but he had taken a fall the week before and was unable to go. But this was nothing new for the retired Naval Lieutenant. He was always helping others. The Ronald McDonald House, the United Way, the Tulsa Chapter of Alzheimer’s Association and so on. He saw it as his mission.

Sadly, Richard (Dick) Biedermann passed away on October 3 after a long battle with heart disease. He was buried on October 6 with full military honors by the VFW and Patriot Guard Riders.

You can read more about Dick Biedermann here and view his obituary here.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Capt. Theodore “Ted” Williams is this week’s Wednesday Hero and was suggested by Cindy

Capt. Theodore

Capt. Theodore “Ted” Williams (Center)
83 years old from Inverness, Florida
VMF-311, Marine Aircraft Group 33 (MAG-33)
August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002

U.S. Marines


Everyone knows Ted Williams as one of the greatest Baseball players of all time, but many may not know that he also served his country during W.W.II and Korea.

Williams joined the V-5 program to became a Naval aviator after enlisting in the Marine Corps in 1942. He received his pilots wings two years later in 1944. He never saw action as Japan surrendered as he was in Pearl Harbor awaiting orders. He did, however, in the Marine Forces Reserves and was later recalled in to active duty during the Korean War. He flew 39 combat missions before being hospitalized with pneumonia which resulted in the discovery of an inner ear infection that ultimately disqualified him from flight status.

You Can Read More About Williams here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Steve. Leland Pennington is Wednesday Hero.

F/O Leland H. Pennington

F/O Leland H. Pennington
24 years old from Alma Place, New York
332nd Fighter Group
1921 – April 21, 1945

U.S. Army Air Corps


Sadly, little is known about Flight Officer Leland Pennington’s military career. He joined the Military sometime in 1941 or 1942. He became one of the famed Tuskegee Airmen. Then in 1945, after a bombing run on the Attnang-Puchheim marshalling yard in Austria, F/O Pennington was lost after completing a successful escort mission.

You can read more about F/O Pennington here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.
Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

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Second Lt. Perla Kimes is Wednesday Hero. This week’s Wednesday Hero is brought to us by Greta Perry and John Donovan

Second Lt. Perla Kimes

Second Lt. Perla Kimes
U.S. Army

Second Lt. Perla Kimes has her bars of gold pinned on during a commissioning ceremony this summer at the Leader Development and Assessment Course on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Photo Courtesy U.S. Army

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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Specialists Seaman Sha’Quanda Jacobs is this week’s Wednesday Hero. Read about her below.

Seaman Sha'Quanda Jacobs

Seaman Sha’Quanda Jacobs
U.S. Navy


Religious Programs Specialist Seaman Sha’Quanda Jacobs rings the bell during commemoration ceremony of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States at Naval Air Station Oceana.

Photo Courtesy U.S. Navy Taken by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Terah L. Mollise

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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